Analysis of rapid assessment methodologies in drug use policy field through interpretive and deliberative approaches

Ince, M. (2008) Analysis of rapid assessment methodologies in drug use policy field through interpretive and deliberative approaches.

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Abstract:Rapid assessment methodologies are techniques which are used to quickly profile a policy situation and/or to develop timely interventions by acquiring local knowledge in a participative way. The frequent use of these techniques in drug use issue by governments and international organisations triggers the question of whether these methodologies provide relevant and plausible type of data which makes target populations agree to the terms of transition –means and ends of policy interventions. In this study, interpretive and deliberative policy analysis approaches are used as a lens to answer this question. These approaches basically suggest that in order to make policy actors agree to the means and ends, their subjective meanings should be reflected to the policies and policy process should be articipative which enable these actors exchange their standpoints to reach a shared understanding of terms of transition. In the research, document analysis is carried out by searching for certain interpretive and deliberative criteria in two cases: “Injecting Drug Use Rapid Assessment and Response” study of World Health Organisation and “Rapid Assessment, Response and Evaluation” Programme of United States. Key findings indicate that rapid assessment methodologies are promising as a recent phase in drug use policy field. However, they have some limitations due to time concerns and design problems. Instrumental capacity of methodologies should be increased by adding artefact analysis and some deliberative mechanisms in order to reach a shared understanding among policy relevant stakeholders
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:88 social and public administration
Programme:Public Administration MSc (60020)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/59376
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