Dioxin in Food: The Influence of Parenthood on Risk Avoidance Behavior

Bentfeld, Mareike Sarah (2011) Dioxin in Food: The Influence of Parenthood on Risk Avoidance Behavior.

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Abstract:Hazardous substances are increasingly found in our food. The consumption of all these different hazardous substances can have severe health implications. Especially dioxin can be a serious threat to our health. It is often is a challenge to motivate people to engage in prevention to avoid potential health risks. Therefore, it is of crucial importance to identify the aspects that influence risk avoidance behavior in order to develop efficient risk messages and thereby help people to protect their own health. In this study, a model has been proposed including relevant variables related to risk avoidance and information seeking behavior. Furthermore, differences between women with children and women without children have been analyzed. It has been hypothesized that this model is able to explain risk avoidance and information seeking behavior. Furthermore, it has been hypothesized that women with small children report higher levels of both risk avoidance and information seeking behavior. 115 women between the age 30 and 60 participated in the cross-sectional survey. The survey consisted of different constructs that had been identified as important determinants of risk avoidance behavior and information seeking behavior. The different items have been measured by 5-point Likert-scales. The model was tested using correlation analysis and backwards regression analysis. The differences between the three groups were examined using one-way between subject analysis of variance (ANOVA) and subsequent post hoc tests using the Bonferroni method. The results showed that actual knowledge, self-efficacy, relevance and attitude towards changing eating behavior were significantly predicting risk avoidance behavior. Perceived knowledge, safety, expectation, relevance and information sufficiency were significantly predicting information seeking behavior. Women without children reported significantly lower levels of both risk avoidance and information seeking behavior compared to both other groups. Women with small children reported higher information seeking behavior but no higher levels of risk avoidance behavior compared to women with older children. The study successfully tested a model to explain risk avoidance and information seeking behavior and it supported the assumption that women with children execute higher levels of risk avoidance behavior than those without children.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/60973
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