University of Twente Student Theses

Login

Does a motivational agent affect the motivation and learning of students?

Harmsen, Ruth (2011) Does a motivational agent affect the motivation and learning of students?

[img] PDF
Restricted to Restricted

882kB
Abstract:Learning via simulation-based inquiry environments requires complex skills from learners. This study investigated whether support in the form of a motivational Animated Pedagogical Agent (APA) would affect the motivation and learning of students. Three conditions were compared, two experimental conditions, and one control condition. In the Agent condition, students received support via motivational comments from an APA. In the Voice condition, students received support via motivational comments from an APA, however, the APA self was not present, only her voice was. The motivational support from the agent was expected to increase the motivation and learning from the students. Results showed no significant differences between conditions on motivation during the training (i.e., relevance and confidence). Initial perceptions of task relevance, of students in all conditions, remained essentially the same. The initial perceptions of confidence increased during training, however, the increase was the same across conditions. Also, there were no differences between boys and girls on their perceptions of task relevance, for both the perceptions of tasks relevance remained the same during training. However, analyses revealed that girls scored significant lower on confidence during the training than boys. Furthermore, statistically significant differences were found between girls and boys reactions to the motivational comments during the simulation. The confidence of girls in the voice and agent condition increased during training, this did not happen in the control condition, whereas, confidence of boys in the control condition increased, and not in the voice and agent condition. Analyses revealed no significant differences in final perception of task relevance and confidence, between conditions. Also, no significant differences were found between the final perceptions of task relevance of boys and girls. However, an important interaction effect was found between gender and time, girls‟ scores on confidence increased significant more than scores on confidence of boys from during training to after training, however, girls‟ scores on confidence were still lower at the end than the scores of the boys. Students in all of the three conditions showed substantial learning from pre-test to post-test. The effect sizes indicated that the learning gains of the students were considerable, also in the control condition. Analyses revealed no significant differences in learning gains between conditions, or between boys and girls.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology MSc (66604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/61208
Export this item as:BibTeX
EndNote
HTML Citation
Reference Manager

 

Repository Staff Only: item control page