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Revising the flaming model: examining personality traits as predictors of flaming motives in online forums

Nazareth, D. (2011) Revising the flaming model: examining personality traits as predictors of flaming motives in online forums.

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Abstract:This study has revised the first flaming model developed by Alonzo and Aiken (2004) and tried to analyze flaming in online forums using the revised model. The revised flaming model, based on the Uses and Gratifications theory and McGuire’s motivation theory, implies that personality traits predict flaming in online forums. In the model, three personality traits (Disinhibition, Worrying and Assertiveness) are linked with six flaming motives (Pass time, Entertainment, Escape, Relaxation, Status-enhancement and Anonymity) and analyzed through several hierarchical regression analyses. It was concluded that the current flaming model was not suitable for analyzing flaming in online forums. All hypotheses were rejected, suggesting that personality traits do not predict flaming in online forums. However, due to the low means of the flaming motives it is arguable whether this conclusion is right. Most of the respondents involved in the sample size did not flame which makes it difficult to analyze the flaming model. Besides the personality traits, several control variables also were analyzed for the flaming model. Based on the results, the control variables Age and Spending time on a forum showed a significant effect on several flaming motives. Age was significant with Pass time and Entertainment. Spending time on a forum showed a significant effect with Pass time, Escape and Relaxation. Although significant, both control variables were negatively associated with a negative beta coefficient, leading to the conclusion that younger people and people who spent less time on the forum, would flame more in online forums. In sum, the current flaming model has failed to show any significance; thus modifications are needed for future research.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/61258
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