Controleren van impulsief gedrag: wanneer kunnen we het wel?

Berlo, Marieke van (2011) Controleren van impulsief gedrag: wanneer kunnen we het wel?

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Abstract:With argue that one’s impulse control is better when one carries out two self-control tasks at the same time (simultaneously) than when one carries out only one self-control task. This is because people posses a general inhibition system. A consequence of this system is that inhibitory signals of one domain can spillover to other unrelated domains. We also argue that there is a difference in impulse control when people do two self-control tasks simultaneous versus when they do the same two tasks directly after each other (sequentially). In the first study, we manipulate emotion control. Respondents had to watch one or two film fragment(s) without or with showing their emotions. The impulse control was measured trough resisting tempting food (chips). We take into account if one was on a diet (Restraint Eating Scale, RES). The results show that when a person performs two self-control task simultaneously the impulse control improves, the respondents eat less chips than when one only had to carry out one self-control task. It also appears that when one is exhausted, by not showing any emotion, and directly after that had to resist tempting food (chips) their impulse control was worse than if one was not exhausted, by showing their emotions freely. Study 1 used a conscious task: suppressing emotions, and a unconscious task: resisting tempting food. In study 2 we gave respondents two conscious self-control tasks: the thought suppression task and choosing between two rewards. Choosing a lager but later reward requires impulse control. The results show a difference between the respondents who had to suppress their thoughts and simultaneously had to choose between the rewards, they chose more impulsive, than the respondents who had to suppress their thoughts at first but after that think freely and chose between the rewards. The results of both studies show that there are different findings when people perform two self-control tasks simultaneously versus when they only perform on one self-control task. Also that there is a difference in results when people perform two tasks simultaneously versus when they perform the same two tasks directly after each other. Implications for theory and explanations of the (un)expected results are discussed.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:05 communication studies
Programme:Communication Studies MSc (60713)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/61282
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