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Treatment Expectations and Pain Experience in Dutch and Non-western Non-native Patients with Non-Specific Chronic Low Back Pain: A Cross-Cultural Study

Minnaar, F. (2011) Treatment Expectations and Pain Experience in Dutch and Non-western Non-native Patients with Non-Specific Chronic Low Back Pain: A Cross-Cultural Study.

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Abstract:Aims and Objectives Previous studies have suggested that Dutch physiotherapists and non-native patients differ with regard to their clinical reality, including treatment expectations and pain experience. The majority of these studies were held from the physiotherapists’ point of view. This study focuses on treatment expectations, and pain experience of Dutch and non-western non-native patients with non-specific chronic low back pain, undergoing physiotherapy treatment. In addition to this, self perceived health status is also measured. The studies’ aim is to examine differences in clinical reality between Dutch and non-western non-native patients with non-specific chronic low back pain, from the patients’ point of view. Methods Treatment expectations were measured by a newly created questionnaire, containing 5 items. Each item consisted of a statement concerning treatment expectations, and a Likert-scale ranging from completely disagree – completely agree. Pain experience was measured as back pain disability by the Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale (QBPDS) and as pain intensity by three numeric-rating scales (NRSs), ranging from 0 (no pain) – 10 (worst pain imaginable). The Short-Form General Health Survey (SF-20) was used to measure self perceived health status. Results Significant differences between Dutch and non-western non-native patients were found for treatment expectations, pain experience, and health status. ANCOVA analysis showed that these differences remained significant for one treatment expectation statement, even when controlling for employment status, education level, and pain experience. Differences in back pain disability and average pain intensity remained significant after controlling for education level and employment status. Conclusion The study suggests that there are differences in the clinical reality of Dutch and non-western non-native patients However, the relationship is very complex and influential factors, such as education level, employment status and pain intensity, could partially explain the differences that were found. With respect to treatment expectations, differences between Dutch and non-western non-native patients regarding the opinion that only the physiotherapist is responsible for curing the patient, remained significant after controlling for employment status, education level and pain experience. Overall the study offers some support to the idea that there are cultural differences in clinical reality between Dutch and non-western non-native patients
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/61311
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