Choosing sides in a conflict: The effect of power and moral perspective on lay third parties’ side-taking preferences

Elkink, Dorien (2011) Choosing sides in a conflict: The effect of power and moral perspective on lay third parties’ side-taking preferences.

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Abstract:The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of imbalanced power relations between disputants and third parties on the preference that lay third parties have when taking sides in a conflict. A scenario study among 84 Dutch and German employees revealed that powerful lay third parties are inclined to take sides based more on the interest motive and less on the moral motive in comparison with their powerless counterparts. The effect of power on the interest side-taking motive is mediated through the outcome-based moral perspective. The preference of the powerless for the moral side-taking motive is mediated through the rule-based moral perspective on a marginal significance level. Age and gender also proved to be influential. Age had a positive influence on the moral side-taking motive and a negative influence on the interest side-taking motive. Male participants were more inclined to stick to the moral motive for side taking, whereas women found the interest motive more important.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology MSc (66604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/61594
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