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Decision-making: the connection between arousal, participation and achievement in a realistic setting

Ziel, Tim (2012) Decision-making: the connection between arousal, participation and achievement in a realistic setting.

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Abstract:The role of emotion has always been a topic of interest. In the 18th century, the most common view was that emotion couldn’t have a positive influence on decision-­‐making. Later theories and hypothesis, such as the James-­‐Lange theory and the somatic marker hypothesis saw emotion as an important aspect of decision-­‐making. Nowadays, cognitive and neurological research is used in combination with the newest techniques. These kinds of research show that emotion does have an effect on decision-­‐making. Research also shows that emotion could be important for the motivation to perform. Emotion has been measured in multiple ways: questionnaires, MRI research and by electrodermal activity. EDA is a bodily response given by the central nervous system. EDA can be measured by skin conductance, among others. Only recently it was made possible to measure (emotional) arousal in a wireless way, which means that laboratories aren’t always necessary anymore. Since this development is new, there has been little research done to measure arousal in a more or less unobtrusive way. This (explorative) study tried to establish a possible correlation between arousal and the variables performance and participation. A game has been used to establish this. This game focused on the training of leadership and decision-­‐making. Q-­‐sensors have been worn by participants to measure emotion. Emotion was measured with the total of non-­‐ specific skin conductance responses from the participants, performance was measured with the outcomes of the game and participation as the total amount of communications to the other participants. In this thesis it is hypothesized that there would be a higher correlation between arousal and performance (1), and between arousal and participation (2) with participants/groups with a higher frequency of NS-­‐SCR’s. Emotion was measured with non-­‐specific skin conductance responses, performance with the outcomes of the game and participation as the total of communications from a participant. There was found no proof to support these hypotheses. A correlation between the (Q-­‐sensor) arousal of some of the participants was found. This thesis will end with a discussion about these results.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/61618
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