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Psychosociale interventies. De behoeften en wensen van oncologische patiënten

Vrolijk, Marcella (2012) Psychosociale interventies. De behoeften en wensen van oncologische patiënten.

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Abstract:Background: A growing number of people in the Netherlands have cancer. Patients who are diagnosed with cancer, who are undergoing treatment for cancer, or who are living with cancer can experience different problems, including psychosocial problems. Common psychosocial problems cancer patients experience include distress, anxiety, depression, and experiential avoidance. A number of Dutch organizations, such as NVPO, VIKC, and KWF Kankerbestrijding, try to improve psychosocial screening and care. In addition, these organisations have been mapping existing psychosocial interventions. Research has concentrated on identifying psychosocial problems among cancer patients. However, little is known about the amount of experiential avoidance and the psychosocial needs and wishes of these patients regarding psychosocial interventions. Method: This longitudinal study aims to improve our understanding of the needs and wishes regarding psychosocial interventions. Cancer patients who received surgery in the Hospital Group Twente (ZGT) were asked to partake in this study. Patients received four questionnaires: the distress thermometer, the HADS, the AAQ-II, and a questionnaire designed for this research to investigate the needs and wishes with regard to psychosocial support. Each respondent filled out these questionnaires twice: three months after surgery and six months after surgery. Overall, 56 patients participated. Results: Most respondents were female breast cancer patients (70%). And most respondents scored low on the thermometer, the HADS, and the AAQ-II both times. For more than 50% of the respondents, fatigue and reduced fitness were the biggest problems on the distress thermometer. All correlations between questionnaires were significant, except for the distress thermometer and the AAQ-II. The respondents did not have much interest in psychosocial support (4—11%). Both times, the respondents were mostly interested in activities aimed at handling the body in a positive way (25—29%); a book providing information and exercises (24—29%); improving fitness (50—56%); and reducing fatigue (48—52%). The scores from the distress thermometer, the HADS, and the AAQ-II did not predict the score on the questionnaire about psychosocial support. Conclusion: This study concludes that cancer patients from Twente report a small amount of psychosocial problems, three months and six months after surgery. Overall, the amount of the various psychosocial problems correlates with each other, except for the amount of experiential avoidance and the amount of distress. The patients had little need for a psychosocial intervention three months and six months after surgery. But when they did want an intervention, they were interested mostly in a book providing information, exercises, and activities aimed at handling the body in a positive way. The book and the activities have to be aimed at improving fitness and reducing fatigue. Cancer patients do have the same needs and wishes regarding psychosocial interventions at both times (three and six months after surgery).
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Clients:
Ziekenhuisgroep Twente
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology MSc (66604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/61803
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