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Overeenkomsten en verschillen in Big Five-persoonlijkheidstrekken in de verslavingszorg en forensische psychiatrie

Bruin, Monique de (2012) Overeenkomsten en verschillen in Big Five-persoonlijkheidstrekken in de verslavingszorg en forensische psychiatrie.

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Abstract:There is increasing evidence that treatment outcomes are influenced by different, individual personality traits. Despite this evidence little or no attention is paid to these traits in treatment. As a result, opportunities to fulfil a treatment successfully are missed. The determination of these individual personality traits can be best done on the basis of the fivefactor model. This model consists of five domains of personality, also known as the ‘Big Five’. There is not enough consistent evidence for the prevalence of the Big-Five personality traits in addiction care and forensic psychiatry yet. Because the consequence for treatment can be large, it is important that more research is done. The current study will be conducted to contribute to the evidence of this prevalence. The research is done on the basis of the following research question: What are the similarities and differences in Big-Five personality traits, between addiction care patients and forensic patients? The hypotheses are that both groups will score the same on Neuroticism and Openness, and that addiction care patients will have higher scores on Extraversion, Altruism and Consciousness. The respondents are divided in two groups: addiction care patients (n=33) and forensic patients (n=33). The respondents completed a digital version of the NEO-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI). The NEO-FFI subscales measure the five domains of personality, as described in the five-factor model of Costa and McCrae. The results were obtained by means of a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). The total scores of both groups on the different There is increasing evidence that treatment outcomes are influenced by different, individual personality traits. Despite this evidence little or no attention is paid to these traits in treatment. As a result, opportunities to fulfil a treatment successfully are missed. The determination of these individual personality traits can be best done on the basis of the fivefactor model. This model consists of five domains of personality, also known as the ‘Big Five’. There is not enough consistent evidence for the prevalence of the Big-Five personality traits in addiction care and forensic psychiatry yet. Because the consequence for treatment can be large, it is important that more research is done. The current study will be conducted to contribute to the evidence of this prevalence. The research is done on the basis of the following research question: What are the similarities and differences in Big-Five personality traits, between addiction care patients and forensic patients? The hypotheses are that both groups will score the same on Neuroticism and Openness, and that addiction care patients will have higher scores on Extraversion, Altruism and Consciousness. The respondents are divided in two groups: addiction care patients (n=33) and forensic patients (n=33). The respondents completed a digital version of the NEO-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI). The NEO-FFI subscales measure the five domains of personality, as described in the five-factor model of Costa and McCrae. The results were obtained by means of a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). The total scores of both groups on the different domains of the NEO-FFI were compared to each other. For none of the domains a significant difference between the groups was found. Therefore, only the hypotheses about Neuroticism and Openness can be confirmed. The conclusion is that addiction care patients and forensic patients do not differ in personality traits of the Big-Five.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/61835
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