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The influence of MBSR-training on attentional subsystems in a sustained attention task : an ERP study using intracutaneous pain stimuli and a peak detection approach

Maser, Dustin (2012) The influence of MBSR-training on attentional subsystems in a sustained attention task : an ERP study using intracutaneous pain stimuli and a peak detection approach.

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Abstract:Objective: To determine the influence of a mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) training on Event Related Potential (ERP) components that are correlates of sensory processing, attentional orienting, response inhibition, and stimulus evaluation of intracutaneous electrical stimuli in a sustained attention task. Methods: A separate-sample pretest-posttest design was used. The experimental group took part in an EEG experiment after a mindfulness based stress reduction (MBSR) training. The control group took part only in an EEG experiment. Visual cues directed spatial attention constant to one side (left or right). The side (left or right) and the intensity (high or low) of the intracutaneous stimulation varied from trial to trial. Half of the participants were instructed to respond only to attended high intensity stimuli by pressing a foot pedal. The other half was instructed to respond to low intensity stimuli. The relevant ERP components were the sensory N1, the orienting response P3a, the inhibitory NoGo-P3 and the target sensitive P3b. Only the N1 and P3a components were analyzed using a peak detection approach. The NoGo-P3 and P3b components had to be excluded from detailed analysis because of great individual variation in peak latencies. Results: No group effects were found concerning the N1 amplitude and latency. The P3a was decreased for the MBSR group at FCz for unattended stimuli, but there was no group difference in latency. The MBSR group reported less perceived pain on the right arm after the last trial of the experiment as compared to the control group. Conclusions: The results suggested that the positive effects of the MBSR-training in (chronic pain) patients could be explained through an decreased attentional orienting response towards the pain sensation. Additionally, it seemed that the MBSR training could induce a stronger habituation effect concerning pain.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/61852
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