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“(How) does listening to intensely pleasurable music influence consumption-related reward-seeking behavior?”

Weusten, E.I. (2012) “(How) does listening to intensely pleasurable music influence consumption-related reward-seeking behavior?”.

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Abstract:The aim of this study was to investigate whether the satisfied feeling generated by listening to intensely pleasurable music can work on a general level, diminishing the desire for other types of reward such as food. 120 students and employees of the University of Twente participated in an experiment in which the effect of three different music conditions (no music, neutral music and intensely pleasurable music) on the desire for other rewards and on actual eating behavior was measured. Present study was not able to find support for the main hypothesis that listening to intensely pleasurable ‘chill inducing’ music diminishes the desire for other types of reward. Negative correlations found between musically induced chills and the desire for other rewards (M&M’s and drinks) did not remain significant when the thirst of the participants and the time between their last meal and the experiment were used as covariates. Interpretations for the lack of results are discussed, including the possibilities that (a) the manipulation of the intensely pleasurable music was not strong enough, (b) participants were too distracted by the questionnaires to focus on the music or provided snacks, (c) some measurements took place before chills had actually occurred, (d) the measure of chills was not sensitive enough, given that chills were assessed by the participants’ estimate of chill intensity, without physiological or neurological measurements. Previous studies do indicate that the subject is worth further investigation. For future research it is recommended to combine physiological and/or neurological measurements with behavioral research, allowing for more accurate investigation of the subject.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:05 communication studies
Programme:Communication Studies MSc (60713)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/62183
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