Conflict asymmetrie en efficacy in sport teams - Een studie naar het effect van het ervaren van druk op conflict asymmetrie en teamprestatie en de invloed van efficacy op dit effect

Bokking, Kim (2013) Conflict asymmetrie en efficacy in sport teams - Een studie naar het effect van het ervaren van druk op conflict asymmetrie en teamprestatie en de invloed van efficacy op dit effect.

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Abstract:Conflicts arise where people work together (Oudenhoven & Giebels, 2009), as also within sports. Research on conflict focuses particularly on business (De Dreu, Kluwer & Nauta, 2008; Euwema & Giebels, 2004; Jehn, 1997; Jehn, Rispens & Tatcher, 2010; Oudenhoven& Giebels, 2009; Van der Vliert, 1997). In sports, just like in business, people generally strive to reach the best possible performance. To improve athletic performance it is important to study the influencing factors. One of those factors that influences team performance within a group or team, is conflict (Amason, 1996; De Dreu & Weingard, 2003; Jehn 1995; Saavedra, Early & Dyne, 1993). This research focuses on the effects of experienced pressure by team athletes, asymmetry within a team, and the influence on the team performance. Also, research will show if the relationship between experiencing pressure and conflict asymmetry is moderated by the efficacy of the athletes. Quantitative analysis shows that experiencing more task- and personal conflict asymmetry leads to a reduced subjective team effort. Contrary to expectations, team athletes show to experience more task-and personal conflict asymmetry under less pressure than when they experience more pressure. Self efficacy, which is the belief in their own qualities and the ability to use these qualities at the right time (Bandura, 1997) can be considered as a moderator for the relationship between experienced pressure and individual personal asymmetry. Team athletes with a higher level of self efficacy, experience less personal conflict asymmetry in comparison to team athletes with a lower level of self efficacy.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology MSc (66604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/63187
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