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The Relationship between the Dimensions of the “Measurements in the Addictions for Triage and Evaluation” (MATE) Questionnaire and Personality Disorders - Possible risk profiles

Müller, Kathrin (2012) The Relationship between the Dimensions of the “Measurements in the Addictions for Triage and Evaluation” (MATE) Questionnaire and Personality Disorders - Possible risk profiles.

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Abstract:Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop a model to predict the presence of personality disorder traits in general, as well as per cluster, using the total scores of the MATE. Methods: The sample consisted of 102 patients registering for treatment at Tactus Addiction Treatment. During the 90-minute intake session, the MATE was administered. The SIDP-IV was administered in the second session. Because of the low prevalence of personality disorders in the sample (23%), a dimensional score was conducted for personality disorder traits in general, cluster A traits, cluster B traits, and cluster C traits. Variables that showed a relationship (p<.05) with the percentage of present personality disorder traits and variables that were in accordance with the hypotheses were included in a multivariate linear regression model. This was done for all four dependent variables separately. Subsequently, variables that did not remain independent predictors of present personality disorder traits were one by one removed. Results: The optimal predictive model (comprising the MATE total scores), after excluding non-significant predictors, consisted of depression (β=.394, p<.001) and personality (β=.340, p<.001). Overall, 34.8% of the variance of present personality disorder traits was explained by these variables (p<.001). After excluding non-predictive variables in the stepwise multiple linear regression method, the optimal model consisted of psychiatric comorbidity (β=.254, p=.008) and personality (β=.288, p=.003). In total, this model explained 17.2% of the variance in the percentage of present cluster A traits (p<.001) which indicated that the model explains present cluster A traits inadequately. The optimal model of cluster B traits consisted of depression (β=.223, p=.022), anxiety (β=.304, p=.002), and personality (β=.209, p=.023) after the exclusion of all non-predictive variables. The model explained 30.5% of the variance in the percentage of cluster B personality traits. For cluster C traits, the optimal model was composed of depression (β=.358, p<.001) and personality (β=.252, p=.008). Overall, 24.4% of the variance in the present cluster C personality traits was explained by these variables. Conclusion: This study has shown that the MATE possibly provides more information than was thought. It has been proven that the MATE can disclose risk-profiles which might point to a personality disorder. High scores in depression in combination with high personality scores should thus alarm the professionals to perform additional diagnosis for personality disorders.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology MSc (66604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/63277
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