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Collective action as a means for social equity. Two mediation models predicting collective action intentions in situations of structural versus incidental inequality

Tel, G. (2012) Collective action as a means for social equity. Two mediation models predicting collective action intentions in situations of structural versus incidental inequality.

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Abstract:The question why people demonstrate, even though the consequences are by definition not always positive or visible, is posed as this paper’s main focus. Many studies demonstrated that social identification, perceived injustice, emotions (e.g. anger and contempt) and perceived efficacy are explanatory variables of collective action intentions. In addition, this study considers the type of disadvantage, that is addressed by the demonstrators, to be an important moderator variable. This type of disadvantage concerns a social inequality that is either constantly present (i.e. structurally disadvantage) or is the result of an incident (i.e. incidental disadvantage). The main assumption is that the type of disadvantage provides an answer regarding the question why in the first situation social identity is the strongest predictor of collective action and in the second case perception of injustice. This study, therefore, presents two mediation models of collective action intentions. Using four different questionnaires, the conducted research resulted in findings supportive of both models. Both social identification (i.e. ethnic identity) and perceived injustice were strong predictors of collective action intentions and both processes could be mediated by anger and perceived efficacy. However, little support was found concerning the designated role of disadvantage in both processes. Only the relation between identification with the overarching identity and collective action was moderated by type of disadvantage; although negatively. Those individuals, who identified themselves with the overarching identity, felt less angry and were less inclined to demonstrate when structurally confronted with inequality (e.g. status of the group within society). The present study also showed that the surveyed individuals were not willing to resort to violent actions, whatever the condition. The results have important implications for work on identification with the subgroup and superordinate group at improving intra- and potentially intergroup relations as well.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology MSc (66604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/63345
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