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Co-creation: The ‘P’ of Participation. How co-creation affects product and brand attitudes and behavioural intentions of non co-creative consumers.

Oldemaat, Lotte (2013) Co-creation: The ‘P’ of Participation. How co-creation affects product and brand attitudes and behavioural intentions of non co-creative consumers.

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Abstract:The aim of this study is to investigate whether awareness of the fact that a product is developed in co-creation, affects product and brand evaluations. The potential of co-creation for a company is increasingly recognized. However, previous studies focus mainly on the internal effects of co-creation for the company, whereas external effects receive little attention. Co-creation might also affect the way products and brands are perceived in the marketplace. Data of 359 participants that evaluated manipulated advertisements through an online questionnaire is analysed. Co-creation is conceptualized using two dimensions: ‘involvement in co-creation’ (low or high) and ‘information about the co-creator’ (yes or no). Furthermore, a control group (no co-creation) is included. ‘Variety seeking behaviour’ and ‘self-congruity with the co-creator’ are selected as potential factors that might affect the relationship between the dimensions of co-creation and product and brand evaluations. The results of this study suggest that co-creation can influence product and brand evaluations. However, no significant main effect of using co-creation on product and brand evaluations is found. When comparing the four dimensions of co-creation other effects are found. The ‘level of involvement in co-creation’ has a main effect on product evaluations. Consumers have a more positive attitude towards the product and are more satisfied with the product when involvement in co-creation is high compared to low. In addition, they think the product is of higher perceived quality, more innovative, and they have higher purchase intentions towards the product. No main effect of ‘information about the co-creator’ is found. It is observed that ‘self-congruity with the co-creator’ and ‘variety seeking behaviour’ moderate the effect of ‘information about the co-creator’ on product and brand evaluations. When consumers score high on ‘self-congruity with the co-creator’, ‘information about the co-creator’ has a positive effect on product and brand evaluations (for product attitude, product innovativeness, word of mouth about the product, brand satisfaction, brand innovativeness, brand purchase intention, and word of mouth about the brand), compared to no information about the co-creator. Moreover, high ‘self-congruity with the co-creator’ leads to more favourable scores on product innovativeness, product trust, brand innovativeness, and word of mouth about the brand compared to the control group (no co-creation). For high variety seekers, ‘information about the co-creator’ leads to higher scores on brand satisfaction, brand differentiation, and purchase intentions of the brand. Based on these results, it is concluded that communication about co-creation can effect product and brand evaluations. Therefore, co-creation can be used for external effects as well as for internal effects. However, success is not guaranteed.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:05 communication studies
Programme:Communication Studies MSc (60713)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/63460
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