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Unattainable goals of patients with rheumatoid arthritis: How goal disengagement and goal re-engagement can facilitate successful adaptation

Kleinveld, Janine (2013) Unattainable goals of patients with rheumatoid arthritis: How goal disengagement and goal re-engagement can facilitate successful adaptation.

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Abstract:Objectives - Rheumatoid arthritis patients are often faced with difficulties in accomplishing personal goals. This is due to characteristic disease symptoms such as pain, fatigue, stiffness, and the loss of function as well as the progressive course of disease. This longitudinal study examined the success of the goal management strategies goal disengagement and goal re-engagement in the change of indicators of adaptation to rheumatoid arthritis. These are depression, anxiety, purpose in life, positive affect, and satisfaction with participation and work participation. It was assumed that the goal management strategies remain stable over time. Furthermore it was expected that goal disengagement capacities lead to a positive change in depression and anxiety, while goal re-engagement capacities lead to a positive change in purpose in life, positive affect, and satisfaction with participation and work participation. Moreover it was supposed that a combination of both strategies leads to the most successful change in adaptation, because it approaches all factors of adaptation. Methods – 181 patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis participated in a questionnaire study. Two repeated measures analyses of variance were conducted to assess the stability of goal disengagement and goal re-engagement over the investigation period. Six hierarchical multiple-regression analyses were conducted to examine the relative importance of the goal management strategies for the change in adaptation, using two waves of data from a one year longitudinal study. Results – Both goal management strategies remain stable over the investigation period. Goal disengagement capacities decreased the levels of depression over time. Beside of this no significant association was found between the goal management strategies and a change in adaptation. A combination of both strategies did not relate to a positive change in all adaptation factors, either. Conclusion – The findings suggest no important role of goal adjustment capacities to the change in adaptation to rheumatoid arthritis, with the exception of goal disengagement concerning depression.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/64100
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