Compensatory health beliefs and behaviors on alcohol consumption vesus he theory of planned behavior

Hein, Stephanie (2014) Compensatory health beliefs and behaviors on alcohol consumption vesus he theory of planned behavior.

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Abstract:Objectives. The extensive consumption of alcohol can be defined as a major problem in Western countries. Primarily students are affected by negative health outcomes resulting from alcohol consumption. The most popular theory to explain Behavior is the Theory of Planned Behavior. Although, the Theory of Planned Behavior a valid method to predict human behavior regarding alcohol consumption, its predictive value is limited. In response to these limitations, there are other schools of thought which lead to an explanatory value to alcohol-related behavior. A crucial factor for the prediction of alcohol consumption is personality. Based on literature the personality traits Impulsivity and Sensation Seeking were chosen for this study. Although, most people know the negative consequences of drinking alcohol it is still a popular practice. The knowledge of the negative consequences and the and the contradictory desire to drink create a state of cognitive dissonance. To reduce this dissonance the Compensatory Health Beliefs and Behavior were also measures in this study. Therefore, this study measured the additional explanatory value of Sensation Seeking, Impulsivity, Compensatory Health Beliefs and Behavior to the Theory of Planned Behavior. Design. Cross-Sectional Survey Method. The total sample consists of 113 students were of 79% were female. The mean of the age amounts to 22years. The developed Compensatory Health Beliefs and Behavior scale, Personality Traits and the Theory of Planned Behavior were tested by Persons Correlation and a Hierarchical Regression Analyses. Further, a Mediator-Analysis by Hayes (2012) was conducted. Results. A statistically correlation was found between the Compensatory Health Beliefs and regular alcohol consumption. There is no correlation found between the Compensatory Health Behavior and the consumption of alcohol. The Hierarchical Regression Analyses conducted a significant explanatory value from the Compensatory Health Belief to the Theory of Planned Behavior. Further, the Mediator-Analyses displays that the personality traits are add only explanatory value as a distal factor to the Theory of Planned Behavior. Conclusions. The Results indicates that people who are inclined to drink more alcohol hold more Compensatory Health Beliefs. The Compensatory Health Behavior are statistical not significant. Therefore the major attention for the measure of implicit process for the prediction of alcoholrelated behavior should have the Compensatory Health Beliefs.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/64789
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