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Pinoccio was een Italiaan en geen Nederlander: acceptatie van liegen in een intergroepcontext - De effectn van cultuur, groepslidmaatschap en typen leugen op het accepteren van leugens

Klein, Wilhelmine (2014) Pinoccio was een Italiaan en geen Nederlander: acceptatie van liegen in een intergroepcontext - De effectn van cultuur, groepslidmaatschap en typen leugen op het accepteren van leugens.

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Abstract:In this study we investigate the role of culture, group membership and types of lies in the acceptance of lying. Fifty-two people completed the online survey. The participants had a mean age of 28.94, from which were 56% female and 44% male. The participants were from the Netherlands (33%) and from Germany (67%) and the most of them were students (48%) or employed (44%). We used the Culture Orientation Scale to measure the cultural tendencies of the participants and divided it into individualism and collectivism. To define the group membership we used the Minimal Group Paradigm as a manipulation. The participants got two situations where one was a other-serving lie and one a self-serving lie. The persons who were in the in-group condition had to lie two times to an in-group member and the persons in the out-group condition had to lie two times to an out-group member. After each situation the participants had to fill in questions about the acceptance of this lie and in the end they had to answer questions about acceptance of lying in general. Our hypotheses about main- and interaction effects of the independent variables on the acceptance of lying were mostly confirmed. Other-serving lies were more accepted than self-serving lies (Hypothese 1) and participants who scored high on collectivism generally accepted lying less than participants who scored high on individualism (Hypothese 2). Our study also indicated that people accept lying to an out-group member more than lying to an in—group member (Hypothese 4). The results also showed that other-serving lies are more accepted against an in-group member than against an out-group member (Hypothese 5). Our last hypothesis is that lying to an out-group member is more accepted than lying to an in-group member if the collectivistic tendency is high. Our results show the contrary. People who scored high on collectivism accepted lying to an in-group member more than lying to an out-group member. Generally we could say that our manipulation worked and that not only the cultural tendency or the types of lies influence the acceptance of lying but that the group membership is also an important factor. To get more evident results in following studies it would be important to split the types of lies and the questions about the acceptance of lying clearly.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/64841
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