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Invloed van exercise self-efficacy op bewegingsgerelateerde compenserende gezondheidsopvattingen en -gedrag

Zottmann, C. (2014) Invloed van exercise self-efficacy op bewegingsgerelateerde compenserende gezondheidsopvattingen en -gedrag.

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Abstract:This study explored compensatory health beliefs and behaviour and its relation with exercise self-efficacy. Compensatory health beliefs are beliefs that the negative consequences of unhealthy behaviour can be compensated or neutralized by performing (other) healthy behaviour (Knäuper, Rabiau, Cohen, & Patriciu, 2004). These beliefs are problematic because they are often not implemented and thus the healthy behaviour is not realized. The aim of the study was to examine the influence of exercise self-efficacy on compensatory health beliefs, intentions for compensatory behaviour and performing compensatory behaviour. A longitudinal online study was carried out with a time interval of two weeks. In addition to the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES; Nooijen et al., 2013) an exercise specific questionnaire about compensatory health beliefs and a questionnaire about performed compensatory behaviour were used. The questionnaires were completed by 136 respondents. As expected, the results showed that those who scored low on exercise self-efficacy had more compensatory health beliefs. It was further demonstrated that people with low exercise self-efficacy formed less intentions for compensatory behaviour. Contrary to expectations, it was found that people with low exercise self-efficacy performed more compensatory behaviour. Compensatory health beliefs and exercise self-efficacy showed predictive value in explaining compensatory behaviour but intention to perform compensatory behaviour was not a significant predictor. In addition, it was found that the relation between exercise self-efficacy and compensatory health behaviour was partially mediated by compensatory health beliefs. All results were found both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Further research is needed to understand the relation between exercise self-efficacy and compensatory behaviour. It is recommended to examine the variable implementation intention in future research to examine why there was no relation found between intention to compensatory behaviour and performance of compensatory behaviour.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/65827
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