Exploratief onderzoek naar het gebruik van fysiologische metingen tijdens het leren autorijden : de relatie tussen subjectieve inschattingen van de cognitieve werkbelasting en het skin conductance level.

Dorrestijn, Serena Maria (2014) Exploratief onderzoek naar het gebruik van fysiologische metingen tijdens het leren autorijden : de relatie tussen subjectieve inschattingen van de cognitieve werkbelasting en het skin conductance level.

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Abstract:The goal of this explorative study is to determine if it is possible to use physiological measurements while following students who are learning how to drive a car. Besides investigating if the methods used in this study are capable of producing usable data, the relationship between subjective and objective measures of the cognitive workload will be also be focused upon. The objective measurement of cognitive workload is measured by using the physiological EDA, Electro dermal Activity. For further analysis we made use of the Skin Conductance Level (SCL). The subjective measurements were made with the Rating Scale of Mental Effort. Six participants from the driving school Irma van den Berg took part in this study. The participants were between 17 en 22 years old. During all the driving lessons the Q-sensor, as produced by Affectiva, was worn around the left wrist to measure the SCL. Apart from this measurement every student filled in the RSME at the beginning and end of the driving lessons. By doing so they estimated the amount to which they felt the cognitive workload was called upon. This study is ideographic. This means that we followed a small amount of participants during a longer period in time. We measured during the entire learning process, from never driven a car until the final driving exam. By maintaining this study type we accounted for the complexity of physiological measurements and the variations in physiological data that can occur within a participant. The results show that the chosen method can be considered successful. Usable data followed the use of the Q-sensor and the RSME. The results show that there is no connection between subjective and objective measurements of the cognitive workload. The correlations between the two variables were not significant. However, it was shown that the driving instructor had the capabilities to give good estimations as to the experience of the cognitive workload as estimated by the student. Often the estimation was equal to the experience reported by the student. There was no matter of habituation present in this study. While learning how to drive there was no decline in the cognitive workload. While unexpected, the results show no difference in cognitive workload between a regular driving lesson and the final driving exam. It can be concluded that the presented method and the measurement of physiological data of people who are learning to drive, can be considered successful. However, due to the small amount off participants it is unknown whether the gained results are applicable to all learning drivers and driving instructors. The results showed that the instructor present in this study is very skilled at judging the amount of cognitive workload as perceived by the student. Based on this study it is not possible to make inferences about the population of driving instructors based on this single case study. It is also a possibility that although this study did not show a relationship between subjective and cognitive workload, that there could be a relationship between the two in another population. This all together makes that the results and conclusions of this research are usable but should be interpreted with care. However, the results and conclusions of this research show several possibilities for further research to be conducted.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/65948
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