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The role of job rotation and psychological motivators on occupational expertise

Cheung, K.L. (2014) The role of job rotation and psychological motivators on occupational expertise.

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Abstract:Introduction: Occupational expertise enables employees to cope with changing job requirements. This study investigates which psychological factors promote or impede occupational expertise of employees. Viewing occupational expertise as an outcome, psychological constructs may explain how an individual develops expertise needed to perform the various tasks and responsibilities of a job adequately. Our purpose has been to gain insight in the antecedents of occupational expertise in order to enhance strategies to develop employee’s occupational expertise. Theoretical framework: The conceptual model is framed using the Integrated Change Model, which assumes that individuals go through three different motivational phases before behaviour change is established. We tested the model and examined whether occupational expertise is positively predicted by motivation to learn, whether motivation to learn is positively predicted by self-efficacy, whether self-efficacy is positively predicted by job rotation, and whether age and tenure have moderating roles between self-efficacy and motivation to learn. Methods: This study combined two datasets (2009 and 2011) of similar studies to test the conceptual model. Data in both studies were based on a cross-sectional survey with production employees of the textile firm. Variables of interest were matched in order to analyse data from both studies. Operationalisation differed in the two studies; therefore recoding was needed. The model was tested using structural equation modeling - path analysis - with AMOS. Results: No support was found for the fit of the conceptual model. This may be due to insignificant results regarding tenure and job rotation. However, significant positive relations within the model were found for motivation to learn on occupational expertise and self-efficacy on motivation to learn and occupational expertise. Age was found to positively moderate the relation between self-efficacy and motivation to learn. Effect sizes were small to medium. Discussion: This study contributes to the understanding of occupational expertise, by providing theoretical insight into the relationships among job rotation, self-efficacy, motivation to learn, age, tenure, and occupational expertise. Our findings are interesting for the human resources development policy in all organisations that employ people. Job rotation may not enhance occupational expertise through self-efficacy and motivation to learn. However, managers should create opportunities for the employee to develop higher levels of self-efficacy. This enhances the motivation to learn leading to higher levels of occupational expertise. Employers should keep the psychological contract positive in order to stimulate employees to participate in activities in which they learn and develop. It is important that employees receive positive feedback and that employees are stimulated to experiment with new activities. This creates opportunities for the employee to develop higher levels of self-efficacy. In turn this enhances the motivation to learn leading to higher levels of occupational expertise.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:85 business administration, organizational science
Programme:Business Administration MSc (60644)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/65993
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