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Do bimodally presented sequences in the sequence production task offer a benefit in performance and task-specific learning as compared to unimodally presented stimuli?

Hilhorst, B.E.G. (2014) Do bimodally presented sequences in the sequence production task offer a benefit in performance and task-specific learning as compared to unimodally presented stimuli?

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Abstract:This study investigated if a bimodal format of stimulus presentation in a sequence production task resulted in improved performance as compared to unimodal stimulus presentation, due to the invocation of visual and auditory working memory, and/or the presence of a sensory integration mechanism resulting in an improved consolidation of sequence information in working memory. The effect of practice on task-specific learning was investigated as well. Participants were presented sequences of four stimuli using unimodal (visual or auditory) or bimodal (audiovisual) stimuli. After a brief preparation period, a Go/Nogo signal was given signaling the participant to either respond by pressing the corresponding keys on the keyboard, or to withhold a response. Behavioral measures as well as the contingent negative variation (CNV) were analyzed. The results showed no beneficial effects for bimodal as compared to visual sequences, while the auditory condition performed worse. We found that the auditory CNV was less pronounced overall, corresponding with the poorer performance in this condition. Furthermore, a session effect was found at C1, suggesting improvement of working memory use and increased general motor preparation as a result of practice. Furthermore, we found that practice resulted in a decrease of the general CNV for bimodal stimuli, whereas the visual and auditory CNV increased. This could indicate that practice leads to a different encoding for bimodal sequences, albeit without beneficial effects on performance. Keywords: working memory, sensory integration, CNV, DSP-task, modality.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology MSc (66604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/66244
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