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Value management: meer dan een workshop : een onderzoek naar de implementatie van value management resultaten

Wit, R.M. de (2015) Value management: meer dan een workshop : een onderzoek naar de implementatie van value management resultaten.

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Abstract:Value Management (VM) is a comprehensive, analytical and creative application of value methods, with the aim to maximise the value of an organisation or a project in a systematic manner. VM can be used proactively to increase the value for money in a project, or be deployed reactively to solve a problem with regard to value. Value is the relationship between satisfaction of needs, and the use of resources. The optimal value that can be achieved is a balance between the many different needs and the resources required. A VM study consists of three phases: the pre-study, the VM workshop and the post-study. The pre-study serves as preparation for the VM workshop and the post-study covers the implementation of VM results in the project. While implementing the VM results leads to benefits in the project, the realized benefits appear to lag behind on the potential benefits that could be realized. Figures from the US Federal Highway Institution show that 57,5% of the recommendations resulting from VM studies are not implemented. Conversations with members of project teams show that also VM results with potential are not being implemented. The implementation of the proposed recommendations is of great importance for the effectiveness of VM, because VM is effective if goals such as cost reduction, more support or more functional performance are achieved. This research focuses on the implementation of recommendations from the VM workshop in the decision making process. The goal of this study is to identify the factors and conditions that influence the implementation of VM results in the decision making process of the client and explain why VM results are fully, partially or not being implemented. Factors are being identified in the theory after which an analysis will show how these factors identify the implementation of VM results. Suggestions that could make VM more effective will be made. The main question of this study is: Which factors influence the implementation of VM results in the decision making process? In the literature, six factors are found that seem to influence the implementation of VM results. These factors would influence the implementation according to mechanisms developed in a framework. The found factors are the following: 1. The extent to which the VM result conflicts with the vision and the demands of the client; 2. The extent to which decisions have to be adjusted; 3. The support for the VM result from stakeholders; 4. The support for the VM result and the responsibility of the project team; 5. The relationship between costs and functionality (value); 6. The extent to which the VM study is a part of the design process of the project team. Through cases analyses has been analysed which factors influenced the implementation of VM results in four projects. These factors are processed in a confrontation matrix that shows which factors lead to full, partial or no implementation. The following conclusions can be drawn from the confrontation matrix: For full implementation of VM results it is essential that they do not conflict with the vision and demands of the client, made decisions do not have to be adjusted, have support of the stakeholders and the project team, increase the value of the object and fit the current phase of the project of the project team. 7 For partial implementation of VM results, it seems to be essential that they have support of the stakeholders and the project team, and also increase the value of the object. Because only VM results were partly implemented, no firm conclusions can be made. VM results were not implemented if the factors for full or partial implementation were not present. This means that VM results were not implemented if there wasn’t at least support from the stakeholders or the project team, or the worth of the object didn’t increase. From the validation of the factors it seems that the found factors correspond with the hypothetical factors from the literature. Also, no new factors have been identified. The theoretical framework describes the mechanisms involved in implementation. This study shows that personal motivation is no mechanism in the implementation of VM results. One reason could be that when implementing VM results the project team has to be motivated instead of an individual team member. With regard to the found factors, suggestions for measures have been made that try to eliminate the VM results with few or no potential and increase the degree of implementation. Possible measures during the three VM study phases are the following: Measures pre-study: 1. Taking the vision and demand of the client into account during the selection of the VM ideas. This way, this information can be taken into account when organising the VM study and selecting VM ideas to develop during the workshop. 2. By organising intake interviews with both the client of the project and key stakeholders, it will become clear what their requirements and wishes are so that the VM study can be adapted accordingly. 3. Explaining VM to decision-makers and letting them participate to create support for both VM and the implementation of VM results. 4. Immediately upon making the planning for the project, decide how VM can contribute to the design process. 5. The facilitators should be commissioned to carry out the entire VM study, so they can guide the post-study and thus support the project team during the implementation phase. Measures workshop: 6. During the selection of the VM ideas to further develop, taking the gathered possibilities in the project into account. This means that the facilitators compare the VM ideas with the found vision and demand of the client and the made decisions. This can be done during the two study days. Measures post-study: 7. The facilitators have to support the implementation phase, as agreed during the pre-study. It seems this phase is rarely if ever performed. The first five measures are validated during the second VM study of project A9 Amstelveen. This VM study resulted in six of the seven VM results being implemented. Interviews with members of the project team and the facilitators revealed they found the measures useful to apply. However, further research is needed to determine the exact effect of the suggested measures.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:ET: Engineering Technology
Subject:56 civil engineering
Programme:Construction Management and Engineering MSc (60337)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/68821
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