Welbevinden en klachten als voorspellers van non-adherentie bij patiënten met een Posttraumatische Stress-Stoornis in de tweedelijns GGZ

BRINKS, F.K. (2016) Welbevinden en klachten als voorspellers van non-adherentie bij patiënten met een Posttraumatische Stress-Stoornis in de tweedelijns GGZ.

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Abstract:Background: Non-adherence has been named one of the biggest problems in health care for decades. Non-adherence is defined as not commiting to the advised treatment by a healthcare professional after the intake phase of a treatment. It brings a number of negative consequences for the individual as for society, worsening symptoms and making health care costs rise. Alot of researchers adressed this topic, focusing namely on the effects of non-adherence in medication treatment. Little is known about the predictors of non-adherence and little research focused on psychological treatment, making it a priorty in this current research. The purpose of this study is to identify predicors of non-adherence in patients undergoing psychological treatment. It will focus on positive mental health and mental illness, covering the whole spectrum of mental health. This study will try to identify these factors at two different phases in the treatment, namely the symptom reduction phase and the rehabilitation phase of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder treatment. Method: To be able to identify wellbeing and pathology as predictors of non-adherence at the different phases of treatment, participants have been split into non-adherent and adherent groups over the different phases. In between the fases the non-adherent and adherent group were compared looking at the level of wellbeing and the level of pathology. Thereafter was examend if the identified factors in fact were predictors of non-adherence. Results: No differences were found between the non-adherent and adherent group in the symptom reduction phase, looking at level of pathology and wellbeing. In the rehabilitationphase however were found differences between the two groups. The non-adherent group showed a significant higher degree of pathology and a significant lower level of emotional wellbeing when compared to the adherent group in the same phase of treatment. Dispite of the found differences in the current study, the factors wellbeing and pathology could not be identified as predictors of non-adherence. Discussion: Current study showes that the level of wellbeing and pathology influence non-adherence, only in the rehabilitation phase of traumatreatment. Despite the found differences between the nonadherent and adherent group, indicating a predictive value of the level of wellbeing and pathology on non-adherence, these factors could not be statistically identified as predictors of non-adherence. The level of wellbeing and pathology could certainly be predictors of non-adherence at the beginning of a therapy. The hypothesis is that the people with the lowest levels of wellbeing and the highest level of pathology do not feel the ability to work on their problems in a therapy, and therefore not participate in therapy.Future research should broaden its vision, looking at all kinds of factors that could predict non-adherence. Demografic factors, general symptomlevel, the relationship between the therapist and the patient and praktical barriers are possible predictors. An important finding in the current study is that symptomlevel and level of wellbeing are identified factors influencing non-adherence in the rehabilitation phase of treatment, whereas these same factors do not seem important in the symptom reduction phase. Future research should take into account that different factors could predict nonadherence at different stages of the same treatment and could differ amoung different treatments.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Clients:
Mediant, Enschede, The Netherlands
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology MSc (66604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/69368
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