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Learning complex motor procedures : can the ability to learn dexterity games predict a person's ability to learn a complex task?

Kaschub, Verena L. (2016) Learning complex motor procedures : can the ability to learn dexterity games predict a person's ability to learn a complex task?

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Abstract:Objectives: MIS seems to be more difficult to perform than open/regular surgery. Because of its differences to regular surgery it can lead to more risks and problems. These risks cannot be fully explained by cognitive or ergonomic factors. As previous studies suggest different correlations between the performance in MIS and specific cognitive factors can be found (Anastakis, Hamstra, & Matsumoto, 2000). Because of MIS’s advantages it is important to research which factors might predict an ability of skills that are needed to perform well on MIS. The aim of this research is to study whether one dexterity task has predictive power for learning another dexterity task. Moreover, the question is asked if these predictions can be more accurate if the skills are viewed holistically rather than viewed as specified cognitive abilities. Method: 40 participants took part in this study. Each participant repeated four different dexterity tasks for a specific amount of times. Per trial the time was measured and observations were noted down. The measured time was used to estimate individual learning curves. Results: A Pearson pairwise correlation was exercised between the four different tasks per parameter. The parameter virtual previous experience and the learning parameter showed no strong correlation. In comparison a strong correlation could be detected between the Drawing maximum performance and the Origami maximum performance. Conclusion: In conclusion it can be seen that it is only partly possible to predict the ability of a person to learn complex motor procedures by letting them perform dexterity tasks. It can be seen that the maximum performance of two tasks seemed to be associated. If a person has a talent in Drawing the person will also score high on the Origami task. It should be worked on these results in more detail to examine if other tasks are connected, or any specific underlying factors that might determine those tasks.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/70010
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