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Through a surgeon’s eyes : the influence of visual-spatial ability and different camera positions on laparoscopic simulator task performance, among novices

Ebelhäuser, Julian (2017) Through a surgeon’s eyes : the influence of visual-spatial ability and different camera positions on laparoscopic simulator task performance, among novices.

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Abstract:Objective: From previous research, it is known that visual-spatial ability (VSA) is a predictor of laparoscopic task performance. It helps surgeons to adapt to the indirect and sometimes shifted view on their performance. In this study, we tried to reproduce and validate earlier findings on the influence of camera angle and VSA on laparoscopic task performance. It was the overall aim to investigate under which camera angles the influence of VSA would be of significant impact. Method: For this study, a sample consisting of 37 inexperienced students was used. During the experimental session, the participants completed a mental rotation test and a computerized ‘paper folding test’ in order to quantify their VSA. Afterwards, the participants were given a custom-made artificial laparoscopic simulator task on a self-made simulator box. The task consisted of eight sessions, which were all conducted under a different camera angle (0°, 45°, 90°, 135°, 180°, -135°, -90°, -45°). Results: The analysis of the collected data rendered significant evidence for a performance degradation under shifted camera angles and a significant interaction between VSA and the different camera angles. Conclusion: In this study, we replicated earlier findings of performance degradation under shifted camera angles. Moreover, we were able to prove that participants high on VSA performed more accurate and faster than participants low on VSA under the conditions of non-zero-degree camera angles, except for a camera angle of 180 degrees. It can be stated that for some conditions VSA influences performance, but among novices, other navigational strategies seem to play a major role, too.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Clients:
UMC ST Radboud, Nijmegen, Netherlands
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology MSc (66604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/72433
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