The role of World Assumptions in the development of PTSD: Cultural differences between western and non-western respondents

Gebauer, M. (2017) The role of World Assumptions in the development of PTSD: Cultural differences between western and non-western respondents.

[img]
Preview
PDF
1MB
Abstract:Refugees are at high risk to develop Posttraumatic Stress Disorder due to traumatic events they experienced. Studies found that culture influences how individuals deal with traumatic events, but not what these differences are and how they influence PTSD. The study’s purpose was to find out whether world assumptions play a mediating role regarding cultural differences for PTSD symptoms. Predictions from literature were that western respondents would have more positive world assumptions than non-western respondents. 837 patients of the Foundation Centrum ’45 in the Netherlands filled in questionnaires that measured world assumptions, PTSD symptoms and traumatic events. In contrast to the predictions, non-western respondents had more positive world assumptions than western respondents. Western respondents had more severe PTSD symptoms of ‘arousal’ than non-western respondents. No differences were found for other PTSD symptoms. Viewing the world as less benevolent and oneself as less worthy was related to more severe PTSD symptom ‘arousal’, whereas perceiving the world as more meaningful was unexpectedly related to more severe symptom ‘arousal’. The relationship between culture and the symptom ‘arousal’ was found to be mediated by world assumptions. Results were mostly not in line with former research. Limitations, implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/72548
Export this item as:BibTeX
EndNote
HTML Citation
Reference Manager

 

Repository Staff Only: item control page