Exploring the new constructs of exercising : how exercise related obsessive-compulsiveness, compensatory health beliefs (CHB's) and outcome expectations are related to exercise addiction and normal exercise

Klein, Ann-Christin (2017) Exploring the new constructs of exercising : how exercise related obsessive-compulsiveness, compensatory health beliefs (CHB's) and outcome expectations are related to exercise addiction and normal exercise.

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Abstract:Objectives: The purpose of this study was to gain knowledge about how exercise related obsessive-compulsiveness, compensatory health beliefs (CHB’s) and an individuals’ outcome expectations are related to addictive and normal exercise. Method: 331 young adults aged between 18 and 35 years (M= 21; SD= 2.5) participated in an online cross-sectional survey study where they had to fill in a battery of questionnaires such as the ‘Compensatory Health Belief Scale’ (Rabia et al., 2006), the ‘Commitment to Exercise Scale’ (Derakhshanpoor, 2006) as well as self-developed scales which measured constructs like exercise related obsessive-compulsiveness and outcome expectations. Data-analyses: In order to answer the above mentioned research question, five hypotheses were formulated which were tested by means of Pearson correlational and moderation analyses. Results: The results showed that there are generally univariate associations between the constructs in question. More specifically, the analyses revealed that the relationship between the weekly amount of exercising and being affected by exercise related obsessivecompulsiveness is not influenced by the frequency and intensity with which a person engages in physical activity. Other findings indicated that the more exercise self-efficacy a person has, the weaker is the relationship between the weekly amount of exercising and using CHB’s. Additionally, weekly exercising significantly predicts being affected by exercise related obsessive-compulsiveness and there is a positive relationship between the weekly amount of exercising and a persons’ outcome expectations. A final result was that CHB’S are associated with exercise related obsessive-compulsiveness. Conclusions: The findings revealed that exercise in general and exercise addiction more specifically are important topics about which more knowledge has to be obtained in order to prevent this type of dependency and therefore also its’ psychological as well as physical consequences. Furthermore, many opportunities for future research open op such as studying how the constructs in question form a larger picture of causality, how obsessivecompulsiveness can be prevented, which role cognition and behaviour plays, if there are any differences in gender or culture and how outcome expectations can be increased without increasing the risk for becoming addicted by exercise.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/72755
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