What makes a young adult take or not take self-protective action against cyberbullying? A Study on Risk Communication

Hellmann, M. (2017) What makes a young adult take or not take self-protective action against cyberbullying? A Study on Risk Communication.

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Abstract:Cyberbullying is a new and fast growing form of traditional bullying. It has hazardous consequences for victims as well as offenders. The position of social media, the internet and new technologies makes risk communication to prevent and control cyberbullying effectively difficult. Previous research found that risk communication about a particular risk is more effective when it does include efficacy messages. Moreover, supporting or opposing peer feedback might influence the effect of risk communication either positively or negatively. For these reasons, this study examines the relationship between risk communication including efficacy information, peer feedback and the intention to take self-protective action against cyberbullying. With the use of a questionnaire, 314 German primary-school pupils were asked about cyberbullying. The results indicate that high efficacy information and supporting peer feedback are positive predictors of the intention to take self-protective action. Pupils who are conscious of the need for recommended self-protective actions feel able to perform them. Those who receive supporting peer feedback show more self-protective actions.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology MSc (66604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/72915
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