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Self-management in older adults who are temporarily admitted to a nursing home for rehabilitation after a lower limb fracture and how this can be supported by technology

Goolkate, Tess (2018) Self-management in older adults who are temporarily admitted to a nursing home for rehabilitation after a lower limb fracture and how this can be supported by technology.

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Abstract:This study aims to get a better understanding of self-management in older adults who temporarily rehabilitate in a nursing home after a lower limb fracture and how technology can support self-management. Based on components of self-management, concepts related to self-management, and the Self-Determination Theory the term self-management for rehabilitation came up and will be used in this research. Self-management for rehabilitation included the components: Knowledge, Skills, Motivation, Competence, Autonomy and Relatedness. Participants and setting: This study was carried out in the rehabilitation wards of four nursing homes in the Province of Overijssel, the Netherlands. A total of nine older adults (>65 years) with a lower limb fracture participated in this study (8 women and 1 men, aged 79-91). During the expert-meeting a total of 8 researchers were present. Methods: To investigate self-management for rehabilitation, a qualitative semi-structured interview study was held. The topic list, created as a guideline for the interview(s), was based on the components of self-management for rehabilitation. For the expert meeting, the design for lost habits was used. This design served as a tool to come up with a design idea for a technology that supports self-management. Findings: The older adult is highly motivated in their rehabilitation process, but the components autonomy, knowledge, skills and competence are lacking. It is therefore hard to perform self-management for rehabilitation. A model has been developed for explaining the relationship between the different components. Requirements were found for a technology that might support self-management for rehabilitation. The technology should start the interaction. In addition, it should provide the lacking components; knowledge skills competence. Conclusion: The level of self-management is low in the older adult, despite the fact that the older adult is highly motivated. This is mainly due to the fact that the components knowledge, skills and competence are lacking. A form of technology must provide the components that are lacking, as a result of the feeling that no self-management can be experienced or can be performed.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:TNW: Science and Technology
Subject:01 general works
Programme:Health Sciences MSc (66851)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/74354
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