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Learning from visualizations : learning potential of knowledge representations based on design rationale from collaborative decision-making meetings.

Oosterwegel, M. (2018) Learning from visualizations : learning potential of knowledge representations based on design rationale from collaborative decision-making meetings.

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Abstract:The aim of this study was to broaden our understanding of the potential of visualizations to induce learning by testing participants’ memory on two knowledge representations. These knowledge representations were visualized textually and by two different visualizations: a table and a map. Their content was derived from annotation of the design rationale of two transcribed design related Collaborative Decision-Making (CDM) meetings. These two meetings were each translated into a knowledge representation and visualized by the three formats. Each participant in the study saw a textual baseline and one of the two visualizations. These two representations differed on design rationale with regard to their subject-matter, which was derived from the CDM meetings. After inspection of each representation, Multiple-Choice and True/False items tested participants’ memory. These test items were constructed to measure participants’ learning on two different aspects of knowledge: factual- and relational knowledge. So, it was investigated if visualizations could be used for the knowledge representations to foster learning, how the representations were initially retained in memory and in what way they could foster learning. Results provided evidence for the suitability of visualizing a knowledge representation of design rationale for learning. It seemed that not every type of representation was suited to foster learning to the same degree. However, visualizations did bring different advantages over a textual baseline. In some cases, memory accuracy was better and specific aspects of knowledge recalled was nearly significantly better, and response latency was nearly significantly faster without decreasing performance on the memory test compared to textual baselines. Future research should investigate if the value of using “classic” visualizations (table and map) remains the same regardless of; using other content, expanding the time period between inspection and memory test, using other (experimental) settings and if new design decisions will be influenced in a qualitative way. This study gave a start in identifying these visualizations’ learning potential or actual knowledge acquisition during a learning process.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Clients:
Mevr., Nederland
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology MSc (66604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/75107
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