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Creativity, intelligence, and executive functions: Explaining the creativity-intelligence relationship through the involvement of executive functions

Kübler, R. (2018) Creativity, intelligence, and executive functions: Explaining the creativity-intelligence relationship through the involvement of executive functions.

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Abstract:We examined whether executive functions were involved in creativity and intelligence and thereby could explain the creativity-intelligence relationship through directing the access, management, and retrieval of ideas. Twenty-four university students from the Netherlands were assessed on the Raven’s Advanced Progressive Matrices, the Remote Associates Test, a modified version of the Alternate Uses Task, the Stroop Task, the n-back Task, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and the Category Fluency Task. A correlational design was applied to the variables fluid intelligence, convergent thinking, divergent thinking speed and creativity, processing speed, inhibition, shifting, and associative fluency. Based on the results of the Pearson Correlation analysis, three different standard regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between shifting and fluid intelligence, fluid intelligence and divergent thinking speed, and the relationship between processing speed and divergent thinking speed. Results showed that associative fluency was not correlated with divergent or convergent thinking. Furthermore were the executive functions not commonly involved in creativity or intelligence. However, processing speed and fluid intelligence were able to respectively explain a significant amount of variance in the divergent thinking speed. It was concluded that neither the numbers of associations nor the executive functions were beneficial to creativity or the creativity-intelligence relationship. The hypothesized model of the creativity-intelligence relationship emerging through the involvement of executive functions was, therefore, rejected. Our findings suggest that basic capacities of cognitively processing information also influence creativity and thereby represent a more basic foundation which is inherent to higher-order processes such as creative thinking or intelligence.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/75159
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