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Using Ecological Momentary Assessment to Describe the Daily Fluctuations of Binge-Watching Behaviour and its’ Effect on University Students

Lauhoff, M.E. (2018) Using Ecological Momentary Assessment to Describe the Daily Fluctuations of Binge-Watching Behaviour and its’ Effect on University Students.

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Abstract:With increasing online on-demand streaming services such as Netflix or Amazon Prime, binge-watching, i.e. watching more than two episodes in one sitting, has become a common leisure activity. There is considerable debate about the addictive potential of binge-watching and its relatedness to risky lifestyle behaviours, such as unhealthy snacking while watching, this possibly contributing to the rise of people being overweight. However, only few reliable studies are available on this topic, which are also limited by their retrospective design. Hence, this study aimed to describe and understand the binge-watching behaviour of university students and its relatedness to the students eating behaviour and weight status. Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) was used to collect data from 23 participants on their daily watching and eating behaviour for a period of 15 days. Results showed moderate fluctuations in the watching-time and the binge-watching proportion over the course of the week. On average, students watched 1.49 episodes for about 1.42 hours a day, whereas binge-watching occurred on 36% of these watching occasions. A higher watching-time was associated with a slightly increased beverage consumption and unintended snacking frequency. Students with a higher BMI spent more time watching than participants with a normal weight status. The present study offers a more detailed description of the patterns of binge-watching and its potential relatedness to an unhealthy eating behaviour. EMA appears to be useful and valid to measure these complex everyday behaviours and helps to overcome limitations of previous studies. Nevertheless, further research on this topic is necessary and should include the contextual factors and examine other potential consequences of binge-watching.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/75167
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