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Conceptual learning: does the way people categorize concepts resemble their representation in the brain?

Bigga, J.S. (2018) Conceptual learning: does the way people categorize concepts resemble their representation in the brain?

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Abstract:Semantic cognition is an essential skill that enables us to make sense of and bring meaning to verbal and non-verbal experiences around us. There are several theories about where semantic information is represented in the brain, among which the hub-and-spoke theory, which suggests system of modality-specific spokes that are in constant communication with a polymodal hub in the anterior temporal lobe (ATL) area. However, there is little research about the relation between semantic representation in the brain and how this conceptual knowledge is used. The current study aimed to examine this relation by comparing the categories of the semantic map of Huth, de Heer, Griffiths, Theunissen & Gallant, 2016 with how participants grouped the concepts during a card sorting experiment. Even though some groups showed similarities with the categories discovered by Huth et al. (2016) none of the groupings could be replicated one-on-one, which suggests that semantic representation in the brain as found by Huth et al. (2016) is not equal to the use of conceptual knowledge in an open card sorting task. Keywords: semantic knowledge, hub-and-spoke theory, semantic map, conceptual knowledge, card sorting
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:01 general works
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/75325
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