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Perceived barriers and facilitators to quality management of infection control among infection control practitioners

Elling, J.M. (2018) Perceived barriers and facilitators to quality management of infection control among infection control practitioners.

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Abstract:To increase quality of infection control in acute care hospitals in the Netherlands, a better understanding of infection control practitioners’ (ICPs’) perceived barriers and facilitators to quality management of infection control is necessary. Six ICPs working in an acute care hospital in the Netherlands (approx. 700 beds) took part in a focus group interview. Qualitative analysis of the focus group transcript characterized participants’ perspectives. The transcript was coded inductively for thematic development. Related codes have been merged into themes and latterly the themes were assigned to be either a barrier or a facilitator to quality management of infection control. Ten themes were identified as barriers: clinical staff do not consistently assume responsibility for infection control; ICPs’ trainings are considered boring; clinical staff sometimes react to ICPs’ feedback in an uncooperative manner; sanctions policy is not executed in practice; ICPs struggle with duplication of work; quality measures of the Netherlands Health and Youth Care Inspectorate are considered an obligation; top hospital leaders are not engaged with ICPs’ work; ICPs can only give delayed feedback on prevalence and incidence; the electronic health record of the hospital is not connected to ICPs’ files; and the software to perform audits does not allow to weigh the scores for different parts of an audit. Six themes were identified as facilitators: patience and thick skin; being critical, objective, consistent, and responsible; being on site and visible; the ICPs team is always reliable; purposeful use of blinders; and a clear distribution of responsibility to exercise control. Implications of the results are that all clinical staff working in the hospital need to assume ‘ownership’ for infection control efforts; ICPs should foster a relational leadership style; quality measures of the Netherlands Health and Youth Care Inspectorate should be upgraded; and adaptations in the hospital ICT infrastructure should be considered.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Health Sciences BSc (56553)
Link to this item:https://purl.utwente.nl/essays/75567
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