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The Effects of Practice Schedules on Self-Efficacy, Flow Experience, and Task Performance during a Video-Based Training: An Experimental Study

Maseland, J. (2018) The Effects of Practice Schedules on Self-Efficacy, Flow Experience, and Task Performance during a Video-Based Training: An Experimental Study.

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Abstract:Instructional videos are often used to model task performance. To learn from these videos, they need to offer more than an example of task completion. This study departed from a ‘Demonstration-Based Training’ (DBT) approach to optimize the video design for learning. Of these features, only practice schedules were manipulated. This study focuses on the effectiveness of two schedules: (1) blocked practice, (2) mixed practice. Blocked practice is based on a sequence in which task instruction is directly followed by practice on that task. In mixed practice several task instructions precede the practice. The research questions are: (1) What is the effect of the blocked and mixed practice schedule on the self-efficacy of students during an initial and final self-efficacy questionnaire? (2) What is the effect of the blocked and mixed practice condition on flow experience of students during the training, and after the training (immediate, delayed, and transfer)? And, (3) What is the effect of the blocked and mixed practice condition on task performance during the training, and after the training (immediate, delayed, and transfer)? 56 third and fourth grade primary school children (mean age 9.73 years) followed a video-based training on ‘Word’. Participants were randomly assigned to one of the two conditions. The data showed a significant positive change in self-efficacy in both conditions. Also, blocked practice raised these scores more than mixed practice. The data for flow experience showed significantly higher scores on several measurement points for the blocked practice condition. Lastly, the study showed that the blocked practice condition outperformed the mixed practice conditions on a transfer test. For practice tasks and immediate and delayed retention no difference was found. The findings call for a replication study, but the provisional recommendation is to enable blocked rather than mixed practice in video-based software training.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:81 education, teaching
Programme:Educational Science and Technology MSc (60023)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/75911
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