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Explicit and implicit coordination patterns in student teams performing advanced life support in a simulation-based setting : an observational study about the occurrence of explicit and implicit coordination patterns in high and low performing teams and the relationship of these patterns during the simulation

Friedrich, Joscha (2018) Explicit and implicit coordination patterns in student teams performing advanced life support in a simulation-based setting : an observational study about the occurrence of explicit and implicit coordination patterns in high and low performing teams and the relationship of these patterns during the simulation.

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Abstract:Little is known about temporal dynamics in team coordination and their impact on team performance in medical emergency situations. In this observational study, we investigate when and how sequences of explicit and implicit coordination affect team performance in student teams performing advanced life support in a simulated setting. We exhaustively coded video-recordings of 17 student teams to capture temporal occurrences of coordination micro-behaviors, differentiated in two temporal phases of the practice. Team performance was measured with expert ratings by medical teachers. Lag sequential analyses revealed significant differences in explicit and implicit coordination sequences between high and low performing teams. During the setup of cardiovascular support (Phase 1), high performing teams were characterized by patterns where information upon request was followed by further information upon request and summary was followed by a command. During the assessment of the underlying cause of cardiac arrest (Phase 2), high performing teams showed patterns in which action-related talking to the room was followed by further action-related talking to the room. The development of implicit coordination sequences in Phase 2 through explicit coordination sequences in Phase 1 did not find enough empirical support. This study emphasizes the need to take a temporal view on team coordination while considering task requirements. Future research should embed additional measures to understand the establishment and development of team mental models through explicit and implicit coordination patterns in medical emergencies.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:44 medicine, 81 education, teaching, 85 business administration, organizational science
Programme:Educational Science and Technology MSc (60023)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/75916
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