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"What's going on there?" Negotiating common ground in robotic vs. open Surgery : a comparison of surgeon-initiated requests for action in open and robotic surgery

Pelikan, H.R.M. (2018) "What's going on there?" Negotiating common ground in robotic vs. open Surgery : a comparison of surgeon-initiated requests for action in open and robotic surgery.

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Abstract:This thesis investigates how surgical teams negotiate common ground on joint projects in the form of surgeon-initiated requests for action in robotic versus open surgery. Scrutinizing 68 hours of audiovisual data from a multimodal conversation analysis perspective, I reveal how surgical teams build common ground on a turn by turn basis. In open surgery, requests follow a two-turn structure, with the surgeon uttering the request and the addressee accepting and performing the requested action in a nonverbal embodied way. Participants incrementally build common ground on the uptake of the request, and difficulties in understanding can be dealt with smoothly, without interrupting the flow of the interaction. In robotic surgery, requests usually follow a three-turn structure, with an affirmative response token preceding fulfillment of the requested action. These affirmative verbal responses serve to explicitly display acceptance of the request, and failure to produce them causes gaps in common ground. Further, the surgeon cannot monitor fulfillment of requests, and unaccounted delays in fulfillment also result in gaps in common ground. This disrupts the flow of the surgery, causing trouble that can only be fixed by explicit verbalization. This thesis contributes a detailed understanding of requests for action in open and robotic surgery to the literature on requests in institutional settings. Further, it exemplifies how a combination of conversation analysis and Herbert Clark’s theories on common ground can serve to build a detailed understanding of team practices, uncovering details that can only insufficiently be described with other methods. Finally, similarities between the team’s struggle with common ground in robotic surgery and difficulties in distance collaboration imply that initial ambitions to build teleoperation systems for surgery over large distances are still reflected in the robot’s design and shape team practices in today’s collocated robotic surgery settings.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Clients:
Cornell University, Ithaca, USA
Faculty:EEMCS: Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science
Subject:05 communication studies, 44 medicine, 54 computer science
Programme:Interaction Technology MSc (60030)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/76805
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