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Aspiring beauticians' self regulated learning : an examination of regulation activities and conceptions of learning in an on-demand educational program

Sempel, N. (2019) Aspiring beauticians' self regulated learning : an examination of regulation activities and conceptions of learning in an on-demand educational program.

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Abstract:In Vocational Education and Training (VET), teachers have increasingly moved towards on-demand education based on the idea of learner-controlled activity selection. Being a self-regulated learner is a prerequisite to function effectively in an on-demand learning environment since VET students are required to choose learning activities according to their personal learning needs. This indicates that the student must be proactive in his effort to learn and is guided by personal set goals and learning strategies. These strategies students use to learn are regulated by metacognitive strategies, which are in turn influenced by students’ views and beliefs about learning, called learning conceptions. What the students are doing (learning strategies) and why they think they are doing it (learning intentions) may change if a context changes. Currently, little is known of how aspiring beauticians manage to regulate their learning and how their learning conception influences their approach to learning in this new on- demand learning program. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to explore this relationship and a mixed method design was used to gather cross-sectional data from 65 students about their learning conceptions and self-regulation activities. Before and after reflecting on learning experiences students’ learning conceptions were explored with the Conceptions of Learning Inventory to categorise them as having a deep or surface conception of learning. In addition, the Learning Moments questionnaire was conducted to determine a certain degree of self-regulation to which students used various learning strategies when reflecting on multiple learning experiences. It was expected that students with deep conceptions of learning showed a higher degree of self-regulation than students with surface conceptions of learning. However, the relation turned out to be more complex than has been suggested in the literature.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Clients:
ROC of Twente
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:81 education, teaching
Programme:Educational Science and Technology MSc (60023)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/78028
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