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The effects of learning episodic time pressure on learning surgical simulated tasks in novices

Janßen, Lara Marcella (2019) The effects of learning episodic time pressure on learning surgical simulated tasks in novices.

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Abstract:Introduction: Many aspects of simulator training still seem unclear. In laparoscopic surgery both speed and accuracy are vital for a successful operation, therefore it is essential to find an optimal balance between the two in an effort to increase speed, to keep anaesthesia times short, but with the most amount of accuracy as the patient safety has priority. This study aims to investigate the effects of episodic time pressure on learning minimal invasive surgical procedures, to highlight a new area in which simulator-based training could be improved. Method: An experimental, within-subject time-series design was employed. Participants completed a total of 70 trials on the LapSim virtual reality simulator, divided into two tasks, namely the Cutting and the Lifting and Grasping task. The tasks are divided into three phases with two conditions, time pressure and no time pressure. For each task a total of 35 trials is completed. Results: The analysis of the population-level maximum performance parameter for the two measured by Time on task and Damage rate showed an effect on episodic time pressure. Participants were able to improve their estimated maximum performance for the measure of time on task. For the measure of time on task, the effects of the time pressure phase can be observed. Time pressure seems to affect the asymptotes for time on task. The correlations for all three phases and also for the two performance parameters come with a high uncertainty. The correlations for the Damage parameter come with a high uncertainty for Phase 1 (95% Cl [-1,39; -0,90]), similar high uncertainty is shown for Phase 2 (95% Cl [-1,81; -1,61]) and Phase 3 (95% Cl [-1,57; -0,95]). The correlations for Time on task all include 0, therefore it cannot be said with certainty that they were correlated at all. Conclusion This study was the first attempt to investigate the effects of episodic time pressure on learning simulated surgical procedures in novices. With the use of a multi-level non-linear mixed effects model, learning curves were estimated to assess changes in predicted maximum performance. Episodic time pressure showed a positive effect on execution time. The study was able to demonstrate that training with episodic time pressure can change estimated maximum performance. Participants are predicted to perform faster and simultaneously maintain a good level of accuracy for the given task.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/78282
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