University of Twente Student Theses

Login

The Scharff technique: Examining the effectiveness of confirmation/disconfirmation claims on masking the interest of specific pieces of information.

Moth, H.A. (2020) The Scharff technique: Examining the effectiveness of confirmation/disconfirmation claims on masking the interest of specific pieces of information.

[img] PDF
465kB
Abstract:The Scharff-technique is used to elicit information and consists of five different but interrelated tactics. The confirmation/disconfirmation (claim) tactic will be further investigated in this study. Contrary to previous research on the Scharff technique, this study will focus on the quality of information (specific pieces of information). This study is on how the interviewer can best mask his interest in a specific piece of information using the claim tactic of the Scharff technique. More specifically, this study investigated the possible effects of different positions of incorrect (D=disconfirmation) and correct (C=confirmation) claims to which could best mask the interviewer’s interest in the specific piece of information. Participants (N= 307) were asked to take part in an interview and take on the role of “source”. Participants received background information about a planned terrorist attack and were asked to not reveal too much or too little information. Participants were randomly divided into one of five interview conditions: (1) the C-C-C condition, (2) the D-C-C condition, (3) the C-D-C condition, (4) the C-C-D condition or the (5) Direct Approach condition. As predicted, participants interviewed with the Scharff conditions perceived the interviewer to hold more knowledge prior to the interview (vs. the Direct Approach). Additionally, participants in the DCC condition had a more difficult time understanding what information the interviewer was interested in (vs. CCC condition and vs. the Direct Approach). Unexpectedly, the different orders of the claims did not affect masking the interviewer’s interest in the specific piece of information.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology MSc (66604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/80655
Export this item as:BibTeX
EndNote
HTML Citation
Reference Manager

 

Repository Staff Only: item control page