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Exploring task interest, flow, mood and perceived cooperation in a scripted cooperative learning activity

Lucas, D. (2020) Exploring task interest, flow, mood and perceived cooperation in a scripted cooperative learning activity.

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Full Text Status:Access to this publication is restricted
Embargo date:11 March 2022
Abstract:In this research cooperative learning was researched in which a cooperative learning script was applied. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of the phases of a cooperative learning script and what influence it has on students’ mood, flow and the cooperative process. Less was known about possible differences between the phases of the script or the occurrences during the scripted cooperative learning activity. The focus of this study is to understand more about these effects of the phases. The main research question of this study was: To what extent do the phases of a cooperative learning script affect mood, flow and perceived cooperation? The following sub-questions aimed to answer the main question: a) To what extent does mood change over time after each phase of the scripted process, b) To what extent does mood relate to the perceived cooperation, c) To what extent does flow relate to the students’ experienced mood, d) To what extent does task interest relate to students’ experienced flow, e) To what extent does flow relate to the perceived cooperation. The research design for this study was quantitative, using questionnaires before (interest), during (mood) and after the activity (flow and perceived cooperation). A cooperation script is a guideline structured into phases to instruct students on interacting, organizing and planning in the process of the activity (Dillenbourg, 2002). Through the script students are guided on how to communicate and which activity to perform, it describes that tasks should be distributed and what is expected of the students to solve the problem (Dillenbourg, 2002). Through the sequencing by a script, learners are assisted in their interaction with each other and are encouraged to take responsibility in the group process (Weinberger, Ertl, Fischer and Mandl, 2005). Results in this study showed that with a scripted cooperative learning activity, students were positive about their cooperation, experienced a positive flow and a positive mood. The mood of students, measured after each phase, did not significantly change over time, and stayed positive during the activity. There was a positive correlation between task interest and flow, so students that had interest within the topic were more likely to experience flow in the process. Flow also positively correlated with perceived cooperation, which indicates that a higher flow will show a higher perceived cooperation or vice versa, a higher perceived cooperation will result in a higher flow. Furthermore, mood was positively correlated to flow and the perceived cooperation of the students. It can be concluded that during a scripted cooperative learning activity when students feel positive, they are more likely to experience a higher flow and a higher perceived cooperation. This study showed that a thoroughly considered scripted cooperative learning environment ensures that students are immersed and less likely to be distracted. Also, the students are able to be motivated and their mood is positively constant over the course of the activity. With this study it is implied that theoretically a well-designed scripted cooperative learning activity is beneficial for student’s mood and their ability to regulate so that their mood stays positive. The phases of the script should be carefully designed so that it leaves enough opportunity for problem solving, as over-scripting (too much guidance or structure) may cause demotivation. A positive cooperation may improve students’ mood and it will leave students with a positive feeling about their assignment which may cause that they are more likely to recall the content. Furthermore, students are able to reach a state of flow in a scripted cooperative learning activity and this flow might increase if students are more interested in the topic which leads to a positive mood with students. Therefore, a topic that fits the age and interest of the students ensures that students are immersed in a task and less likely to be distracted. Task interest influences flow within heterogeneous groups in a scripted activity but further research is needed on homogeneous groups based on interest if they experience flow as well. Also, specific group processes could be analysed if students’ diverse knowledge and skill backgrounds leads to a different effect in flow and cooperation. The effect of mood on group size is shown within this study, but there may be underlying reasons for a positive mood which are yet to be analysed. There was a positive connection between flow and mood, perhaps with physiological measures it might be able to analyse if there are differences of arousal or state of mood during the activity or afterwards when the activity is finished to understand more about this connection between flow and mood. The results of this study point to implications for practice. A carefully designed scripted cooperative learning environment ensures that students are immersed and less likely to be distracted. Also, the students are able to be motivated and their mood is positively constant over the course of the activity. To succeed in their future careers, students need skills, e.g. critical thinking, cooperation, communication, social skills. In a cooperative learning activity, they are able to practice these skills. Therefore, it is important that the phases of a script are well structured to effectively learn these skills and teachers should avoid randomly placing students in a group without any guidance, structure or clear goal.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:81 education, teaching
Programme:Educational Science and Technology MSc (60023)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/80842
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