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Optimizing the scheduling of elective cardiothoracic surgeries to reduce the variability of demand for intensive care beds

Hernandez Mallol, J. (2020) Optimizing the scheduling of elective cardiothoracic surgeries to reduce the variability of demand for intensive care beds.

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Abstract:The local search shows that variability of demand for IC-beds reduces by scheduling the surgery types with a long length of stay in the ICU at the end of the week, because those also have high variability in their length of stay. After the experimentation, we conclude that the variability of the surgery duration does not influence the number of beds required or the number of cancellations because we can schedule one or at most two CTC-surgeries per operating room per day. When we cluster certain surgery types, we have to schedule fewer surgeries to meet the percentile we desire (it can be different in each experiment) and therefore we need fewer IC-beds. Another advantage of clustering is that the probability that we have a patient in the waiting list that we can assign to the time slot we are assessing is higher; hence, it reduces the probability of having an empty operating room. In the simulation, we also take into account the capacity in the CTC-wards and the flu season, which both may affect the capacity in the ICU. The scientific contribution of this project is the generalised implementation plan for a blueprint schedule that any hospital, that wants to reduce the variability of demand for beds, can implement in departments where elective surgeries are long (in this project we proved that the generalised implementation plan works for scheduling long surgeries). Moreover, we proved the positive impact of clustering surgeries. We conclude that we can cluster two surgery types when they have similar LOS distribution and similar surgery duration
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Programme:Industrial Engineering and Management MSc (60029)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/80983
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