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A mixed-methods case study of communication, influential power and sensemaking as predictors of compliance with change goals in an organisational change context

Brink, T.T. van den (2020) A mixed-methods case study of communication, influential power and sensemaking as predictors of compliance with change goals in an organisational change context.

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Abstract:Organisational change is quite common at present day, but how to realise change strategies has proved to be a challenge for many organisations. About 70% of organisations across branches implementing a change strategy fail, which makes it a widespread problem. Consequently, there is a need to understand what factors influence change outcomes and, more specifically, compliance with change goals. Communication, influential power and sensemaking were identified as variables of interest, based on previous research on organisational change. The study took place in an organisational change context where change was strategically implemented top-down. The results of a multiple linear regression analysis indicated that the model was not significant. However, the backward elimination method led to a significant relationship between traditional allocative resources – which partly define one’s influential power – and compliance with change goals. Therefore, communication and sensemaking were not found to be significant predictors of compliance with change goals in this study. This research is the first to explore the influence of communication, influential power and sensemaking on compliance with change goals in one model, so the findings provide a valuable contribution to existing literature. Moreover, the newly developed constructs to measure communication, influential power and sensemaking proved reliable and can be useful for future research. The context-dependent factors may have influenced the outcomes of the present study, which led to a belief that a similar, preferably longitudinal study with the necessary improvements could result in a more significant contribution to organisational change theory.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:85 business administration, organizational science
Programme:Educational Science and Technology MSc (60023)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/81422
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