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The role of self-esteem on the effects of motivations of online daters on well-being

Chrie, C.S. (2020) The role of self-esteem on the effects of motivations of online daters on well-being.

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Abstract:Online daters are commonly compared to non-users of online dating services in several studies; however, the purpose of this study was to explore differences in well-being and self-esteem between online dating users based on their motivation for use. Furthermore, the role of self-esteem was examined as a potential moderator in this relationship contributing to the lack of studies exploring with-in group differences in online daters. Motivations were defined according to the theory of social motives as seeking sexual encounters, romantic relationships and friendships (Timmermans & De Caluwé, 2017). A questionnaire was administered to 154 participants where they were divided into one of the three groups. Participants all had to complete the Self-Esteem Scale by Rosenberg (1965), and the Mental Health Continuum-Short Form. Two analyses of variance between the three groups proved no significant difference in levels of well-being or self-esteem. Furthermore, two simple moderation analyses were carried out using PROCESS macro by Hayes (2013), showing no significant interaction effect of self-esteem on the relationship between motivations and well-being. All three hypotheses were rejected, whilst not being in line with the proposed research by which they were mainly formulated. The results suggest that differences in well-being or self-esteem may not be affected by the motivations for use. Furthermore, other variables, and unique differences among participants may play a role in affecting well-being and self-esteem, making general conclusions difficult when only measuring motivations. Lastly, the motivations by which users were divided by may not accurately justify the motivations for use in all participants. However, future research might allow space for diversification in responses.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/82093
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