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Testing the effectiveness of Cognitive Bias Modification and moderation of baseline cravings on alcohol consumption in outpatient alcohol addiction treatment

Brockfeld, Marie Pauline (2020) Testing the effectiveness of Cognitive Bias Modification and moderation of baseline cravings on alcohol consumption in outpatient alcohol addiction treatment.

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Full Text Status:Access to this publication is restricted
Embargo date:10 July 2022
Abstract:Theoretical models suggest that alcohol addiction can be explained by an imbalance between conscious processes and automatic processes. Cognitive Bias Modification (CBM) Alcohol Avoidance Training was developed to train these automatic processes by using Approach-Avoidance training. Several studies found positive effects of this training in an inpatient clinical setting with patients who are addicted to alcohol. This study examines whether online Cognitive Bias Modification (CBM) Alcohol Avoidance Training increases the effectiveness of treatment as usual in alcohol addiction in an outpatient setting and whether baseline cravings moderate the effects of CBM training on alcohol consumption after the intervention. The double-blind, randomized controlled trial had 8 online CBM Alcohol Avoidance Training sessions which were added to treatment as usual (TAU) at Tactus Addiction Treatment Institute in the Netherlands, which is based on CBT and motivational interviewing and can be administered as a Web-based or face-to-face treatment. The adult patients completed a pre- and post-assessment and follow-up assessments after 3 and 6 months. Results show that the CBM Alcohol Avoidance Training does not increase effectiveness of the TAU and that baseline cravings do not moderate the effects of CBM training on alcohol consumption after the intervention. More research needs to be done using CBM in an outpatient setting and with different types of delivery modes. This could increase effectiveness and the possibility to replicate results of previous research.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology MSc (66604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/82459
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