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Can mobile gaming habits predict the perceived usability of educational games?

Schulz, C. (2020) Can mobile gaming habits predict the perceived usability of educational games?

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Abstract:Background: Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is a common surgery practice nowadays. MIS entails several advantages compared to open surgery but learning MIS can be challenging due to the unique characteristics of the procedure. Technological advances made it possible to simulate MIS so surgeon apprentices can practice in a safe environment. As simulator training can be related to barriers, mobile applications could be used as additions to existing training methods. To assess the satisfaction with available applications, the perceived usability can be assessed. Two applications, SimuSurg and TouchSurgery, were described and assessed in terms of perceived usability. Isbister and Schaffer (2008) described that being a frequent gamer can influence the perceived usability of a game. This study aims to show the influence of frequent gaming on the perceived usability of the two applications. Results: TouchSurgery received higher SUS scores than SimuSurg overall. Mobile gaming frequency did not have an influence on the perceived usability of TouchSurgery and SimuSurg. Gender did not have a significant effect on the perceived usability of TouchSurgery and SimuSurg, either. Discussion: Results suggest that being a gamer or having more gaming experience does not influence the perceived usability of game-like applications. The claim of Isbister and Schaffer (2008) has not been researched in scientific literature to the best of our knowledge and needs further investigation. The results of the study should be interpreted carefully, as it had several limitations such as a high dropout rate, no laboratory conditions and inaccurate gaming frequency groups.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/83141
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