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Romantic Relationships and Well-being in an Era of Online Dating : How Commitment and Satisfaction in Relationships are Associated with Well-being

Gerlach, Kimberly Claire (2021) Romantic Relationships and Well-being in an Era of Online Dating : How Commitment and Satisfaction in Relationships are Associated with Well-being.

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Abstract:In an era of online dating, emerging new forms of relationships raise interest for scientific inquiry of the association of relationship commitment, satisfaction, and well-being. Further, the extent to which satisfaction mediates the relationship between commitment and well-being is tested. Since the level of commitment is associated with satisfaction, investments, and the quality of alternatives, commitment is expected to be lower in times of online dating (Rusbult, 1980). New forms of relationships are expected to result in low levels of commitment due to lower levels of satisfaction, lower investments, and higher quality of alternatives. Past studies did not observe the association between lower levels of commitment and well-being in much detail. Hence, literature research suggested that satisfaction might be a better predictor of well-being as commitment is expected to be lower in times of online dating. The cross-sectional research consisted of a total sample with 401 participants. The subsequent scales of the investment model by Rusbult et al. (1998) assessed relationship commitment and relationship satisfaction among participants. The Mental Health Continuum Short-Form by Keyes (2018) evaluated the level of positive mental health. An ANOVA mediation analysis was done testing the association of relationship satisfaction, relationship commitment, and well-being. The results showed a significant mediating effect of relationship satisfaction. In particular, the direct effect between relationship commitment and well-being is not significant, meaning that their relationship is fully mediated by relationship satisfaction. Furthermore, relationship commitment is not a strong predictor of well-being, this relationship is not significant. Instead, relationship satisfaction significantly predicts well-being. Concluding, relationship commitment may not be a strong predictor of well-being because several factors reduce the level of commitment nowadays. In turn, satisfaction is a better predictor for well-being. Therefore, the causal association of relationship commitment and relationship satisfaction should be evaluated in future research. Moreover, the investment model could be revisited in future research.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/86640
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