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Computer-based communication in imagined Victim-Offender Mediation : anticipated risks and opportunities

Maurer, N. J. (2021) Computer-based communication in imagined Victim-Offender Mediation : anticipated risks and opportunities.

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Abstract:The current study examined the differences in the anticipated satisfaction with a victim-offender mediation (VOM) based on three computer-based communication technologies (CBC). Within this context, interpersonal aspects of communication were assumed to be influential factors. Richness of information, conversational flow, and emotion communication were expected to vary across CBC technologies resulting in different utility for VOM. Based on that it was expected that multi-party video conferencing would be anticipated more satisfactory than video messaging, and multi-party text interaction. The online experiment adopted a 2 (victim vs. offender) x 3 (CBC-technologies) mixed design and consisted of two blocks. In both blocks the participants were asked to recall and describe a severe conflict situation, one in which they hurt someone and one in which they got hurt. Subsequently, they took part in imaginary CBC-VOM’s. Forty-eight participants took part in the study. Against the expectations no significant difference in the anticipated satisfaction with the mediation process across the three CBC technologies was found, F(2,43) = 0.92, p = 0.41, partial ƞ² = 0.07. However, the inter-item correlations of the dependent variables prompted an explorative path analysis, in which two branches of interpersonal aspects of communication (implicit & explicit) led to the anticipated satisfaction with the mediation process, and subsequently to the anticipated satisfaction with the mediation outcome, F(5,88) = 16.45, p < 0.001. These findings indicate that against the expectations all three CBC technologies have their utility for VOM depending on the individuals perceived capability to establish a conversational flow, communicate emotions, and experience rich communication.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/87407
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